The Student Advocate

Newly+appointed+Dean+of+Students+Dr.+Golz+has+arrived+with+goals+of+improving+student+success+and+the+overall+experience+of+being+at+UNO.+Image+courtesy+of+UNO+Marketing.%0A

Newly appointed Dean of Students Dr. Golz has arrived with goals of improving student success and the overall experience of being at UNO. Image courtesy of UNO Marketing.

Hope Brusstar, Managing Editor

New Dean of Students Dr. Carolyn Golz has arrived at The University of New Orleans with a mission and the experience to help her execute it. She wears floral tattoos, short brown hair and business attire, but she says, “I’m not a business person. I’m a student affairs person.” Having occupied her office for several weeks, she’s still getting used to her job and to the campus.

“My goal for the first semester is to meet as many students as I can … and find out what they want and need.” To that end, she attended the Pontchartrain Hall move-in operations on Aug. 16, and has already been getting in touch with and meeting student organizations.

“My job is to advocate for students … to remove barriers for students,” said Golz. She desires that students see the Student Affairs office as “the place to come when they don’t know where else to go.” She mentioned that a common issue for the university students is being redirected through several different departments before finally getting the assistance they seek. “Even if we don’t know the right office, we’re gonna find the right office before we send them back into the UNO community to bang their heads against a wall. We are going to take that wall away.”

At home, Golz has two dogs. “They are the cutest things ever.” Aside from taking care of them, she said, “I read a lot … when I would walk home from high school after softball practice, I would stop at the library and pick up a stack of books.” Books, she declared, are her form of entertainment, second not even to television. And relatively new to New Orleans, she’s still busy “exploring all the restaurants,” she said. During a vacation, and when the weather is cooler, “I like to camp,” said Golz.

Golz has a Master’s in Experiential Education and another in Criminal Justice Administration, while her Doctorate is in Organizational Leadership. She began her college career as an RA in her dorms at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and finished it with a focus still in the affairs of students, at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

The dissertation she wrote for her PhD is entitled “The Impact of Student Engagement on Alumni Giving.” Her primary argument within is that “student satisfaction is a great predictor of alumni giving,” she says in her blog at http://www.carolyngolz.com/. The dissertation includes many facts and figures describing just what experiences and conditions correlate with a student being likely to succeed and to donate to a university.

With this knowledge in hand, Golz’ aims include “creating a more vibrant student life that makes campus seem like a place where people want to hang out,” she said not just during the day, when commuter students are around, but during the evenings and weekends, when resident students are still looking for activities.

“How do we meet both populations?” she remarked.

“Sustainability is a goal,” said Golz, in addition. Newly appointed to the University’s Sustainability Circle, Golz is interested in making the university more environmentally friendly and aware. She described an event for which Aramark decided against large lemonade and water dispensers and opted for hundreds of cans of lemonade and bottles of water instead, and expressed a frustration with sending garbage to the landfill. “It’s something I want to fix,” she said. “We can educate people.”

“The biggest obstacle we have right now is financial,” said Golz. “Every university has financial constraints … ours are a little harder. We just have to be a little more creative and intentional in [spending] our money.” For example, when leaders of student organizations, different university departments, or her Student Affairs staff members approach Golz with ideas for events or changes to the university, she suggests that they pick just one of their ideas to work with first, or asks if they can bring in more help to make the idea come to fruition.

On a regular basis, Golz is working with Student Affairs to set the tone for the UNO student experience. “The team plans a lot of large-scale events for UNO,” she said including convocation, homecoming and the Mardi Gras parade on campus.

“I’ll have a lot of meetings,” she said, seeing students and faculty across campus for a variety of initiatives. So to see her, a student may need to make an appointment. However, she was encouraging about this. “I’m thinking about having office hours,” she remarked.

“[A student can] contact the office to schedule an appointment, invite me to visit a student organization or event, send me an email … or contact me via social media,” she said. To that point, she can be found on Twitter under the name @carolyngolz, emailed at [email protected], and reached via phone at 504-280-6620. For general information, students can visit studentaffairs.uno.edu.

“We want students to be proud of UNO,” said Golz. “How do we help you be successful here?”